Autopilot causes shin splints...

Discussion in 'Tesla Experiences' started by SoFlaModel3, Sep 1, 2018.

  1. SoFlaModel3

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    ok so let me explain the title of the thread. As a former runner (turned cyclist) shin splints was something I battled on and off in both legs during training. Over the past few weeks I have noticed what feels like a shin splint in my right leg. Now that I am no longer running anymore the only thing I can point back to is my right foot position kind of half resting / half floating over the go pedal while in autopilot.

    Question time —

    Where do you rest your right foot when in autopilot and do you feel anything like shin splints forming? I don’t want to sacrifice safety, so clearly my foot can stray too far from the pedals in the event I need to quickly take over.
     
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  2. FF35

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    I place my foot over the accelerator. For me, Autopilot is way too aggressive with the brakes so I prefer to gently push the accelerator as it's trying to brake. This way it's more of a gentle deceleration instead of getting nauseous in stop and go traffic.

    I hope they improve use of the buffer zone, especially under 20 MPH.
     
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  3. skygraff

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    Haven’t trended toward shin splints yet but, yes, feeling the burn.

    I alternate between hovering/lightly resting over/on accelerator in s&g or slightly congested traffic and relaxing on the floor in clear highway driving (just like old school cc). Truly can’t trust the way it over brakes even in reaction to mergers or phantoms. On the other hand, in s&g, it hasn’t been as aggressive lately and my leg feels better than it used to when I would get cramps going from gas to brake constantly (used to try shifting into lower gear for slower creep but gaps were inconsistent with rabbits).

    Hopefully, the braking will improve and/or the accelerator will get a little more resistance to be a good rest place.
     
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  4. Foxtrotter

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    I think a dead pedal to the right of the accelerator pedal is really needed for using autopilot. Surely that could be built into the not-a-transmission tunnel.

    That would fix this whole issue of what to do with the right foot/leg when using autopilot.
     
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  5. Dogwhistle

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    Depending on the driving situation, mine is usually on the floor about 90% of the time, hovering at others.
     
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  6. JOUL3S

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    You might want to move your seat back a little bit and give yourself more legroom. I haven't had this issue.

    I saw a post on Reddit where the guy said he keeps an autopilot seat profile that is more reclined and extra leg room. Then when he wants to engage he switches to the other profile and the car hugs him like a mech suit.
     
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  7. Bokonon

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    It's funny, as a former runner myself, I had this exact same experience / thought the other day when I spent a lot of time cruising on the highway with Autopilot engaged.

    With my seating position, hovering over the brake is a lot more stressful on my shins than hovering over the accelerator. So, given that, and given that that the car seems to phantom-brake more often than it fails to slow down fast enough for my liking, I tend to hover near the accelerator when traffic is dense or when I suspect phantom braking may occur. Otherwise, I just relax my foot and keep it flat on the ground near the pedals. If I need to slow down quickly while cruising, I just start rolling the right scroll wheel down rapidly to decrease speed while I prepare to re-engage my foot, which not only provides sufficient braking force, but also helps me transition back to manual driving more smoothly should I decide to cancel Autopilot.

    Slightly OT, but useful for anyone who finds their shins tiring out for any reason: my high school cross-country coach taught me an amazingly simple exercise to build up the muscles around your shins, and I credit that exercise for helping me avoiding shin splints during my entire running career. The exercise is.... tap your toes. Yup, that's it. Keep your heel planted on the ground, and repeatedly lift your toes an inch or so off the ground. After 30 seconds or so, you'll start to feel some tension and fatigue around your shin area, and that's when you stop and switch to the other foot. :) Do it at home while you're eating breakfast, at the bus / train station while you wait, or at the office while you're procrastinating on that big project to check M3OC one more time ( :innocent: ). Over time, those muscles will get stronger, become less inflamed with the same workload, and reduce the stress on your lower tibia. Result: decreased likelihood of shin splits, increased pedal-hovering endurance.
     
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  8. John

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    I put my left foot on the dead pedal and—though this is easier to do than to describe—I bend my right leg a little and rest that foot on its side in front of the brake pedal, with my knee bent out. That's very comfortable for me.

    From time to time (merges, lane changes, right before cancelling EAP) I hover it over the accelerator.

    Using the accelerator during EAP is an advanced move that frequent users should practice in order to compensate for EAP's current inability to let people merge when you are "tied" and to make lane changes a little less annoying to cars coming up on you in other lanes.
     
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  9. garsh

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    I used to do exactly that when driving a car with regular cruise control. After several years, I started having some problems with my right hip joint. So I try to no longer do that. I don't know for sure that the positioning *caused* the dull ache in my hip, but the hip seemed to get better when I stopped doing that. I try not to bend my knee outward like that anymore.
     
  10. John

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    I'll keep an eye on that.

    Another tip I would give folks is to experiment with steering wheel position. There may be a place you "normally like your steering wheel to be," but with no gauges to block, consider lowering it down to your lap to help with Autopilot. In a low position, for many people you can rest a hand on a knee and still hold the wheel.
     
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  11. SoFlaModel3

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    That’s excellent advise and something that I absolutely love about this car!!
     
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