F11 Topcoat Sealant

BobD

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#1
Does anyone have experience using the F11 Topcoat sealant?
 

kendthomp

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#2
I just applied it this morning to my Harley. A friend has used it on his bike and loves it. He recommended it to me. I'll post an update after I see how it holds up.
 
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#4
Highly recommend ceramic coatings. Prevents scratches and highly hydrophobic. Adds a great amount of gloss as well
 

SoFlaModel3

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#5
Highly recommend ceramic coatings. Prevents scratches and highly hydrophobic. Adds a great amount of gloss as well
So is ceramic coating similar to wax?
 

MelindaV

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#6
So is ceramic coating similar to wax?
Ceramic coatings create a permanent (semi-permanent depending on the product) molecular bond with the clearcoat. Wax sits on the surface of the clearcoat.
Ceramic eliminates the need for wax, it hardens the clearcoat, gives a glassy gloss, is hydrophobic, some protect against sun damage... overall, it provides similar results as a fresh wax job, but lasts years instead of weeks
 

SoFlaModel3

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#7
Ceramic coatings create a permanent (semi-permanent depending on the product) molecular bond with the clearcoat. Wax sits on the surface of the clearcoat.
Ceramic eliminates the need for wax, it hardens the clearcoat, gives a glassy gloss, is hydrophobic, some protect against sun damage... overall, it provides similar results as a fresh wax job, but lasts years instead of weeks
Thanks!

I don’t mind waxing the car monthly, but this sounds great and definitely worth taking a look at!!
 

JWardell

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#8
Thanks!

I don’t mind waxing the car monthly, but this sounds great and definitely worth taking a look at!!
Monthly!
Modern spray&rub polymer/synthetic waxes last 6mo to a year. Are you still using tins of turtle wax?
 

SoFlaModel3

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Monthly!
Modern spray&rub polymer/synthetic waxes last 6mo to a year. Are you still using tins of turtle wax?
Lol, I should come clean my days of using my old Porter Cable Random Orbital are long since over though I still have it in my garage for sentimental value :)

Weekly I use No Rinse Wash & Shine from
OPT and then every fourth week I use Optimum No Rinse Wash & Wax from OPT (“wax”).

It does well especially considering how much easier it is to apply than traditional wax.
 

JWardell

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#10
Long Live the Porter Cable! Mine has been living in my basement for a while as well. Ahh, the days of having the time to care about the molecular quality of your car's paint.
 
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#11
Another vote for ceramic coatings. Waxes and sealants are great, don't get me wrong, but their ability to repel against some of the more major contaminants (bird etchings/acid rain/water spots) is simply unmatched when compared to coatings. If you've ever washed a ceramic coated car you can tell a major difference in how easy it is to clean and dry.

Bottom line:whether its a sealant/wax/ceramic coating, anything is better than nothing. Still amazes me that people just don't take the most basic of steps to protect their vehicles, especially given how much we spend on them.
 

JWardell

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#12
Another vote for ceramic coatings. Waxes and sealants are great, don't get me wrong, but their ability to repel against some of the more major contaminants (bird etchings/acid rain/water spots) is simply unmatched when compared to coatings. If you've ever washed a ceramic coated car you can tell a major difference in how easy it is to clean and dry.

Bottom line:whether its a sealant/wax/ceramic coating, anything is better than nothing. Still amazes me that people just don't take the most basic of steps to protect their vehicles, especially given how much we spend on them.
Are there any DIY ceramics you can recommend?
 

mdfraz

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#13
What kind of cost would one expect for the ceramic coating? And is it done by a professional or something one could do themselves?
 
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#14
Are there any DIY ceramics you can recommend?
There are some decent ones “OTC” that are a bit easier than say the professional coatings like CQuartz Professional/Finest. One consumer coating is Optimum Gloss Coat (I think that’s the current name). It’s super easy to use, so long as you properly prep the vehicle. The prep is where most consumers, and even detailers, make the most mistakes. The vehicle needs to be paint corrected (buffed) to properly remove any swirls BEFORE the coating is applied. Think of these coatings as a clear coat, you wouldn’t lay clear over scratches, you’re not masking them, you’re simply locking them in. After the paint is corrected, it needs to be prepped with an IPA type of product (CarPro Eraser/Gyeon Prep/Shine Supply Throwback) to remove any kind of polishing oils, wax or glaze that might still be on the surface. Then, and only then, should the coating be applied via the manufacturers recommended process.

Sorry to be long-winded, but coatings are super durable and in some cases need sanding off if applied incorrectly. There’s no dawn wash that’ll remove them.

Hope this helps, happy to answer any further questions.

Kody
 
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#15
What kind of cost would one expect for the ceramic coating? And is it done by a professional or something one could do themselves?
Prices can vary tremendously when it comes to having a detailer apply a coating to your vehicle. The old homage is very true in this instance, you get what you pay for.

Some fly-by-night detailers will do coatings for $5/600 (way too low) and the other detailers are well above $1000/$2000. There are a multitude of variables to consider though: current condition of vehicle (yes, even new cars can be rough from the factory), type of coating being applied and the detailer themself.

Just do your due diligence and find a reputable detailer, if that’s the route you choose.

Hope this helps.

Kody
 

Justmurr

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#16
Prices can vary tremendously when it comes to having a detailer apply a coating to your vehicle. The old homage is very true in this instance, you get what you pay for.

Some fly-by-night detailers will do coatings for $5/600 (way too low) and the other detailers are well above $1000/$2000. There are a multitude of variables to consider though: current condition of vehicle (yes, even new cars can be rough from the factory), type of coating being applied and the detailer themself.

Just do your due diligence and find a reputable detailer, if that’s the route you choose.

Hope this helps.

Kody
That's right in line with the quote I have that starts at $1200 for 4 layers of ceramic pro.
They also said they coat the windows and rims with ceramic pro rain. (I didn't tell them about the glass roof yet)
Also confirmed that it could only be removed via machine polish/abrasion.
 
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#17
That's right in line with the quote I have that starts at $1200 for 4 layers of ceramic pro.
They also said they coat the windows and rims with ceramic pro rain. (I didn't tell them about the glass roof yet)
Also confirmed that it could only be removed via machine polish/abrasion.
That’s a good price if they’re including the rims and windows. Just make sure they are reputable and see if you can check out some of their work. Some of the Ceramic Pro guys have gotten a bad reputation in the detailing realm, they’re not all bad but a little legwork on the front end can save you a lot of hassle.
 

c2c

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#18
There are some decent ones “OTC” that are a bit easier than say the professional coatings like CQuartz Professional/Finest. One consumer coating is Optimum Gloss Coat (I think that’s the current name). It’s super easy to use, so long as you properly prep the vehicle. The prep is where most consumers, and even detailers, make the most mistakes. The vehicle needs to be paint corrected (buffed) to properly remove any swirls BEFORE the coating is applied. Think of these coatings as a clear coat, you wouldn’t lay clear over scratches, you’re not masking them, you’re simply locking them in. After the paint is corrected, it needs to be prepped with an IPA type of product (CarPro Eraser/Gyeon Prep/Shine Supply Throwback) to remove any kind of polishing oils, wax or glaze that might still be on the surface. Then, and only then, should the coating be applied via the manufacturers recommended process.

Sorry to be long-winded, but coatings are super durable and in some cases need sanding off if applied incorrectly. There’s no dawn wash that’ll remove them.

Hope this helps, happy to answer any further questions.

Kody
So what happens 5 or 10 years later, for a good ceramic? Sand it off? Repaint it?
 

mdfraz

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#19
Thanks for the info Kody. I've, unfortunately, got plenty of time before my 3 will get to me so I can do some extensive research.
 
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So what happens 5 or 10 years later, for a good ceramic? Sand it off? Repaint it?
So this will ultimately depend on the coating that was applied and how the vehicle was maintained. Typically speaking, after a couple of years the car will most likely have some swirls present, from incorrect washing/drying and normal wear and tear. At that point you simple perform a little paint correction and reapply the coating. No need to sand or repaint. At this point you are merely correcting the coating, not so much the clear. So think of it this way: rather than polishing the clear coat, thus making it thinner, you are removing a microscopic layer of the coating and then just topping that off with a fresh layer. If you use a standard sealant/wax and perform paint correction every few years (some people do) then you are wearing down the actual clear coat. A coating is a great way to preserve the factory clear coat. Same thing happens if you get a bird etching in the coating itself,you can safely remove the etching, whether polishing/sanding, and then reapply the coating in that area. You get an etching in your clear coat, then you are removing clear to remedy the etching, which you can only do so much before you remove too much and face much larger issues.