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From Electrek: Behind the scene look at how firefighters disable a Tesla battery while...

Discussion in 'News from Electrek.co' started by RSSFeed, Sep 10, 2016.

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  1. RSSFeed

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    Last week, a 62-year-old Tesla Model S owner drove into a sign announcing a construction site on the highway in Gratkorn, Austria. The sedan continued traveling down the highway for ~200 meters before coming to a stop and bursting into flames, according to local media reports (German).

    Fortunately, the driver was reportedly able to get out OK. Overall a fairly banal accident, but the fire department shared a few interesting pictures of their attempt at extinguishing the fire and securing the vehicle. more…

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  2. Kizzy

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    Large amounts of water. Interesting. I guess once a battery breaches, it's no longer about electricity, but chemicals when suppressing a fire.
     
  3. Jayc

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    Clearly there are two aspects to this: (1) HV electrics have to be shut down. (2) Fire has to extinguished

    I am surprised why there is no self shut off mechanism in the battery pack. By the time fire services figure out the shut off mechanism ( assuming they manage it at all ) you'd really be looking at a total wreck. Also one would assume that it is pretty straight forward to detect an impact or accident and shut off battery irrespective of whether there was a fire or not. Can you imagine being involved in an unfortunate accident in an EV and the rescue / emergency services not wanting to come anywhere near the scene for fear of electrocution.

    Tackling the fire itself comes second and as far as I can see, there really isn't a magic bullet here and it would be in some respects, similar to a gas tank fire in an ICE vehicle.
     
  4. Kizzy

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    Right. Battery is disconnected upon airbag deployment. Makes sense.
     
  5. MelindaV

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    there was a point made in a thread on vehicles continue to have power/continue to move after a wreck and why this may not be the case. Their point being, airbags may deploy but the vehicle may still structurally be able to be moved out of a traffic lane under it's own power. if there was an immediate 100% shutoff, many less significant wrecks would be impacted when not needed to be.
     
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    • Kizzy

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      That is a good point. But, these cars do have a 12-volt battery that when dead (according to this article) is able to isolate the main battery of a Model S (that's still the case, yes?). I think requiring the use of a reset switch would be reasonable should the vehicle still be safe to operate.
       
    • Jayc

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      That is a good point.

      In the case of EVs however, the requirement for the HV system to become disabled on a severe impact or battery pack damage is a must I think. It could then be set up such that the start button could still be capable of re-enabling the whole system (by choice) such that it can be moved out of the accident site if structural state permits.

      In any case I think EVs present a different set of issues that will have to be addressed by new processes noting that the world around us, including emergency rescue services, have no special interest in self educating themselves on EVs like those of us on this forum.
       

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