Get Your Wheels Aftermarket Wheels

Discussion in 'Get Your Wheels' started by garsh, Nov 21, 2017.

  1. garsh

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    GetYourWheels posted a thread over at TMC showing pictures of a Model 3 with aftermarket wheels (thanks to @Michael Russo for the original post, and to @Bokonon for the TMC post link). GetYourWheels replied to my request for some more specs. But first, some pictures:
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The wheels are Avant Garde M580.
    They are available in two different widths for the 20" rims you see installed here: 8.5" and 10".
    They installed 8.5" wheels up front, and 10" wheels in back. No spacers were used. Avant Garde's website does not list wheel offsets, unfortunately.
    Tires are 255/35R20 front and 275/30R20 rear.

    I think it looks pretty good, but we need a photo looking down the side of the car before we know how well these wheels fit to the fenders. I'd also like to point out that these particular wheels are also available in 19"x8.5" and 19"x9.5" sizes, which might be better suited to the Model 3.
     
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  2. SoFlaModel3

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    I really like the look of these rims, though having maxed out my budget I can safely assume they’re more than the 19” sport wheel upgrade price of $1,500 so I’ll have to pass in favor of the OEM upgrade. I also literally have no where to store 4 OEM 18” rims with tires.
     
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  3. garsh

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    Digging a little further, here's GetYourWheel's ordering page for the Avant Garde M580:
    https://www.getyourwheels.com/view-wheel/avant-garde-wheels/avant-garde-m580-bespoke

    It looks like it can be ordered in several different offsets (and bolt patterns, and colors), so that's good news.
    Prices appear to be:
    • 19" for $375.00 (both widths), $1500 for set of four
    • 20" for $537.50 (both widths), $2150 for set of four
    So not _too_ expensive. You do have to pay for tires on top of that price though.
     
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  4. SoFlaModel3

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    Not bad at all. Let’s say the rubber is $250/corner on 19s and you’re at $2,500 all in.

    I’m sure many will consider it!
     
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  5. telero

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    I'm pretty sure you could get at least $1000 for the 18" OEM takeoffs. If you get them and sell them instead of getting the 19" OEMs, you're at the $2500 for the aftermarkets. I'd pay the $1000 for a second set of 18s.
     
  6. SoFlaModel3

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    Probably but then when you’re done with the car you don’t have OEMs to put back on.

    Definitely what I would do though if I was going for aftermarket wheels.
     
  7. Ct200h

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    My plan is to order with the 19”s and then get a set of take offs 18” or a set of 17” afternakert for some nice winter tires.
    Not sure if 17” will fit but I bet they will and go with a 215/55/17 Michelin Xice xi3
     
  8. Sandy

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    #8 Sandy, Nov 24, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2017
    One issue that arises with aftermarket wheels is the center bore. Model 3 stock wheel center bore is 64.1mm. When the wheel is fitted to the hub the hub fits tightly into the center bore of the wheel as it’s effectively the same size. This puts the load on the hub and off the wheel studs. It also ensures the wheel is not off center. Many aftermarket wheels use a larger center bore and require hub centric rings. These steel or plastic rings slip over the hub and are sized to fit the wheel center bore. When buying aftermarket it’s a good idea to know in advance if the wheels your buying need hub centric rings. Example not an endorsement: TSportline M3 wheel bores are 64.1mm. No rings required. Personally I don’t like hub centric rings and would only buy wheels that are 64.1mm wheel bores.
    Without the wheel bore being a tight fit with the hub the entire wheel instead of being hub centric is lug centric and the entire load is on the threaded lugs and tapered lugnuts. Not a good idea. Here’s a vid explaining it:



    Here are examples of hub centric rings:

    http://www.hubcentric-rings.com/why_hub_centric_rings/
     
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  9. Mad Hungarian

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    #9 Mad Hungarian, Nov 30, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2017
    Pardon my wheel-nerdiness, but I must elaborate a little here...

    Although it's instinctive to think that in the absence of direct wheel center bore to hub protrusion contact it's the studs or bolts that are somehow carrying vehicle's weight, in actual fact nothing of the sort is happening. The need to ensure a tight fit of wheel's center bore hole onto the hub is simply to ensure that wheel stays centered during installation. Once the lugs are torqued though the hub's horizontal protrusion surface and wheel's hub bore surface are just along for the ride. This is because the clamping load between the wheel's mounting pad and the vertical mating hub/rotor surface is so immense that the two parts then essentially behave as one welded assembly, with the vertical mounting pad, hub and rotor surfaces now carrying the load. If you've never seen the calculation of the clamping forces at work here, it's worth having a look.
    In this case let's look at the 14x1.5mm fasteners as found on all Teslas. Note the recommended torque value used in this calculator came out to 131.78 ft/lbs, but that's close enough to Tesla's service recommendation of 129 ft/lbs to work here:
    upload_2017-11-30_15-26-12.png

    So the clamping force each stud/nut is applying to the wheel/hub/rotor sandwich is approximately 6506 kg, or about 14,343 lbs. Multiply that by the 5 lugs and you get a total clamping force of 32,530 kg, or 71,715 lbs. I can assure you from practical experience that even the strongest wheel will fail spectacularly long before you reach the forces required to move the wheel even a fraction of a mm in relation to the hub surface. Want further proof? Have a close look inside the lug holes of any alloy wheel that's been in service for a good period of time. The inside walls of the small hole at the base should be nice and smooth. If they were ever to come in contact with the stud or bolt, as would have to be the case if they were supporting the vertical loads, you would see very pronounced galling from the jagged surface of the steel threads imprinting themselves into the softer aluminum. I have only ever seen this in cases where the lugs came loose. That is in fact the only time the studs or bolts will ever carry any part of the vehicle's loads (and usually not for long... :eek:)
    So yes, for convenience's sake it's nice to have a finely machined direct-fit wheel that doesn't require a centering ring. But having centering rings in no way compromises the wheel's job as a structural element in supporting all the static and dynamic loads the car and road can throw at it. Once it's correctly torqued, it pretty much becomes one with the hub.
     
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  10. garsh

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    Available in 18x10???
    Wow. I'd like someone to post a picture of how that looks mounted on the rear of a Model 3. :)

    Is 19x10 not available?
     
  11. Mad Hungarian

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    If we use the +45 offset I think the 18x10 rear stance would be just about the same as what you see here for the 20x10. Of course you wouldn't have that lovely big-diameter look, but you'd save a fair amount of weight and have a noticeably smoother ride.

    Re 19x10, as we already make it a 9.5" it wouldn't make sense to do the tooling for a new size with just an extra half-inch, we'd likely go with a 10.5" or 11". So far not enough demand, but that could always change...
     
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  12. Ct200h

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    I think a set of 17”wheels for winter tire use could sell well.
    Those who purchase the $1500 sport wheel option at order time could get a set of 17’s and mount some nice winter tires on them.
    Any 17 fitments yet?
     
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  13. Prodigal Son

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    If I can't get my hands on a second set of aeros to use for my winter tires, I'll be hoping to find something reasonably priced for ski trips. Don't care about looks, just a stock sized reasonably-priced set of 18s that don't require any adaptors or other BS.
     
  14. zosoisnotaword

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    I'm sure you'll be able to grab a set from someone with custom wheels. I know I'll be selling mine on here when the time comes.
     
  15. Prodigal Son

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    Yeah I'm reasonably hopeful. I'm actually going to try and get them before I even have my car if possible, so I can get the winter tires installed and they're ready to go for ski trips right away.

    Guess I'm gonna need to buy a heavy-duty jack, too…
     
  16. oneshortguy

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    You mean this?

    https://tsportline.com/products/18-tst-tesla-wheel-set-of-4-model-3
     
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  17. Prodigal Son

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  18. ng0

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    #18 ng0, Dec 7, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
    Those are nice! Very tempted to get those instead of the $1500 sport wheels. Although these are 18's, don't know if I'll notice a difference. Can you use the tires from the original wheels with these? I'd still want the official tesla logo in the middle of 'em, but according to the site that's doable.

    Do you have to buy the $50 set of lug nut covers with it or do they come with?
     
  19. oneshortguy

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    Their whole marketing with wheels is a direct rim swap and using the Tesla TPMS, center caps, lug nuts, and tires. For example, if your Model S has 19 inch wheels, you can get 19 inch TSTs and just swap the rim only.

    It does not mention lug nut covers so I would assume it is separate.
     
  20. ng0

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    Gotcha. Thanks for the info! This is gonna be a tough call. I feel like I should just get the sport wheels so it's straight forward and I don't have to worry about it, but these look really nice and are 250 bucks cheaper (after purchasing the lug nuts). I'll probably be deciding at the last second when I go through the configurator.

    If anyone does end up getting these, hopefully you can do some range tests to see how (if at all) these impact range on the Model 3.
     
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