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State Tax incentive investigation.

Discussion in 'Reserving, Ordering, Production, Delivery' started by benthebear, Nov 12, 2016.

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  1. benthebear

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    #1 benthebear, Nov 12, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2016
    Hi ya model3 owners club crew, and members! I have a question, has anyone looked into the advantages/disadvantages of buying a tesla from a state that has a higher tax rebate than the state you live in? Example, I live in CA max state credit is $2500, what if I were to become a resident(getting drivers license, residency address (using a friends address) all the requirements of being a resident of that state) or part-time resident of CO where they have a max tax credit of $6,000? Would it be worth it? Would one have to file taxes in both states? What do ya'll think the pros and cons are of this? What's more has anyone done or know someone that has successfully done something similar? one benefit i can think of when the model 3 is finally delivered......ROAD TRIP back to your primary state! :) Let me know what you'll think :)

    PS I would not do anything illegal in reference to the above, just theoretically and legally would the above or something similar be possible and financially beneficial.
     
  2. MelindaV

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    will depend on which states you have residences in. For CO I believe I saw the $6k required the vehicle be registered and spend the majority of it's time in that state. and if bending the rules, I don't know about in CA, but up here, the State Patrol makes a good amount off tickets of people living in WA but driving a car with out of state plates.
    Maybe just be happy with what credits/incentives there are 'truly' available to you.
     
  3. Bruce D

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    Colorado is dropping to $5k next year on new car purchases. They're also offering the rebate at the time of purchase as a reduction of the price. No more paying first, filing, then rebating and a much simpler calculation. Further, right now, they offer that same rebate on used cars registering for the first time in the state. That will cease starting in 2017. Starting in 2016, it's available on new cars only. I think the best deals out there are on used, pre-2016 Model Ss or Xs that are deeply discounted because of the old autonomous hardware but are still eligible for some state rebates (albeit, not federal). Check the state website for official conditions, rules, etc.
     
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    • TheTeslaFan

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    • ModFather

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      Won't work. If you own a residential property in California they consider you a resident even if you live in California only one month per year. Anytime you sign a statement under penalty of perjury that you are a resident of a State and that is not true, it is illegal and you are committing a crime. If you need an extra $3,500 that bad, you might as well go rob a bank.
       
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      • Bruce D

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        Your Colorado source is inaccurate. The calculator is obsolete. It's a flat $5,000 only on new vehicles. They dropped all rebates on previously-owned EVs. The internet is woefully absent of current, accurate information. Contact the Denver Electric Vehicle Council. They're a super organization and a great resource for all things Colorado EV.
         
      • TheTeslaFan

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        That's unfortunate but good to know. Thanks for the information.
         
      • Red Sage

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        Sometime in the 1990s, the California State Legislature passed a law for precisely that purpose -- as a 'stated purpose' anyway. I know that I personally saw the same license plates on the freeway every day on my way to work... Plates from Washington, Oregon, Utah, Nevada, and Arizona... Obviously these were cars that had been registered out-of-state, but belonged to people who lived in the Los Angeles area. The idea was that anyone that had a change of address but had not registered their car within 30 days would be fined. And, to drive home the point, their cars would be impounded for thirty days minimum, pending registration.

        Well, it was a poorly crafted law. Y'know, as is the case by pretty much every law passed as a knee jerk reaction to some 'issue' that politicians brought up during election campaigns when 'There oughtta be a LAW!' Law enforcement agencies noted the law applied to all California residents. So, they had a target rich environment. But it was mostly those with California license plates -- whose registration had expired. Those were in much higher concentrations than out-of-state license plates for cars that were on the freeway everyday. So those are cars that were stopped and fined and impounded, for thirty days minimum, over and over and over again.

        People who were low income would buy cheap cars from 'We Carry Our Own Contracts' used car dealerships. Cops would stop them for having unregistered cars. The cars would be impounded. Low income people who couldn't afford to register their cars to begin with sure as [HECK] couldn't pay thirty days worth of impound fees either. So the vehicles would be forfeit, and sold via auction. Those typically reduced funds would be used to pay the fines. The cars would be bought by used car dealerships that carried their own contracts. And those cheap cars would again be bought by low income people who might not be able to register them in a timely fashion. Wash, rinse, repeat.

        Eventually, after several years of this going on, someone noticed and sued -- probably on the grounds of the State 'imposing excessive bail, excessive fines' as an Eighth Amendment violation. Certainly not on the fact that the law was being regularly enforced against low income individuals in a disproportionate and discriminatory fashion. Or the fact that the law was hardly ever enforced for the supposed 'stated purpose' for which it was initially proposed -- getting out-of-state vehicles registered in California -- because that would make too much sense. Isn't it great how laws don't have to be logical at all to be enforced? But, officers of the gosh-darned law were still granted a grace period whereby they could continue to pull over cars, fine their drivers, and impound the cars anyway, for just about any traffic violation, as a matter of blatant 'highway robbery', so they did just that. Right up until the very last minute. Because revenue generation reigns supreme. I think the law finally expired as of 12:01 am PST on January 1, 2012.

        A buddy of mine, who knew he was on restricted driving to only go from home to work and back (I think as part of a child support payment thing, as drivers licenses are regularly pulled by the DMV as a 'courtesy' to the courts whenever someone is accused of being a deadbeat Dad [accusation equals guilt, apparently]) was pulled over just two blocks from his house, on his way home. That was maybe on December 28, 2011 or so. He was just hungry and decided to take a quick drive about four blocks away to grab something to eat, but hadn't thought about that before he got home from work, and went out a few hours after he got home. The cops didn't listen to his pleas at all and towed his car. When he related the story to me, that's when I pointed out they were just doing as ordered -- getting their final quota of impounded cars for the last month that they were allowed to do so. He had simply been caught in the 'sticky mouse trap' with no recourse.
         

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