Track Mode is here

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Gavyne

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Tesla's rolling out Track Mode to Performance Model 3's. Here's how it works: https://www.tesla.com/blog/how-trac...rackmode&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social

How Track Mode Works
The Tesla Team November 8, 2018

Electric powertrains have numerous advantages over internal combustion engines. In addition to low cost of ownership, energy efficiency, and near silence, they also offer unparalleled responsiveness. Since the introduction of Tesla Roadster in 2008, we’ve exploited the immediate availability of motor power and torque to achieve unprecedented straight-line performance, making the car’s forward acceleration a pure extension of the driver. With Track Mode, which is designed specifically for use on closed autocross circuits and racetracks, our goal was simple: use that same motor power and torque to make cornering on the track feel just as natural as forward acceleration.

The fundamentals
How does motor power help you corner? If you’ve ever pulled a car’s handbrake in an icy parking lot, you know that you can make a car turn with more than just the steering wheel. That’s because torque – whether accelerating or decelerating a vehicle – reduces a tire’s ability to hold the car in a turn. Apply torque to the rear wheels, and the car will rotate more in the turn (if you see a car drifting, that’s drive torque; or think about pulling that handbrake, that’s brake torque). Conversely, if you apply either kind of torque to the front wheels, this reduces a car’s ability to turn.
By precisely controlling whether torque goes to the front or the rear wheels, Model 3’s dual motors can immediately and silently increase or decrease the car’s rotation in a corner at your request. This requires lightning fast torque control and the ability for the car to precisely regulate traction on each tire – both of which are standard features in every Tesla, but that we’ve expanded upon with Track Mode to make highly technical driving effortless.

More than just stability
The most exciting aspect of Track Mode is how we can change the balance of the car using just the motors – a technique that would typically be interrupted by a system known as stability control.
Stability control is an important safety feature found in all modern passenger vehicles that applies brakes to certain tires in order to prevent your car from spinning out of control during dynamic maneuvers. The feature is designed to make a car’s behavior more predictable in emergency situations, but it also constrains a driver to a limited range of capabilities at the expense of driver authority and fast lap times. As a result, many cars have “sport” modes that reduce or even disable these safety systems in order to allow a professional driver to maximize the capability of what a car can offer.
Instead of taking away features to enhance the experience of professionals, Track Mode adds features to make any track driver, amateur or professional, feel superhuman on a track. This is possible because with Model 3 Performance, we replaced the stability control system with our own in-house Vehicle Dynamics Controller – software developed specifically for Tesla vehicles that acts both as a stability control system and also as a performance enhancement on the track.

More features, not fewer
Here is a summary of many of the features we employ with Track Mode while you’re on the track:
  • Motor Torque for Rotation
    Our Vehicle Dynamics Controller constantly monitors the state of the vehicle and all of the inputs from the driver to determine the driver’s intention and affect the rotation of the car in a matter of milliseconds. Track Mode relies heavily on the front and rear motors to control the car’s rotation, and we have the ability to command a 100% torque bias. When cornering, if rotation is insufficient to the driver’s request, the system commands a rear biased torque. Conversely, when rotation is excessive, we command a front biased torque.
  • Increased Regenerative Braking
    Heavy regenerative braking may not be comfortable for day-to-day driving, but on a track, it has several key advantages. It gives the driver more authority with a single pedal, improves the endurance of the braking system, and sends more energy back into the battery, maximizing the battery’s ability to deliver large amounts of power. It also gives the Vehicle Dynamics Controller more authority to create or arrest rotation with the motors when your foot is lifted off of the accelerator pedal.
  • Track Focused Powertrain Cooling
    The high output power required for track driving generates a lot of heat, so endurance on the track requires more aggressive cooling of the powertrain. We proactively drop the temperatures of the battery and the drive units in preparation for the track and continue to cool them down in between drive sessions. We can also allow operation of the powertrain beyond typical thermal limits and increase our refrigerant system capacity by overclocking the AC compressor into higher speed ranges.
  • Enhanced Cornering Power
    We typically think of using brakes to slow down a car, but you can actually use them to make the car faster out of a corner. All Model 3s are equipped with open differentials, which send an equal amount of torque from the motors to both the left and right wheels. When cornering, the wheels on the inside of the corner have less load on them, which means they can provide less tractive force than the outside wheels. To prevent excess slip on this inside tire, we have to limit the torque for both wheels, leaving power on the table. In Track Mode, we simultaneously apply brake and motor torque to produce a net increase in tractive force while cornering. This is similar to how a limited slip differential works, except when using the brakes, the differential can be optimized for various driving conditions.
Model 3 Performance with Track Mode integrates active controls with the vehicle’s already planted chassis and nimble, responsive steering by maximizing the driver’s authority under any condition. We do this with the same secret weapon used for 0-60 mph launches: the two motors that sit on each axle. And like most aspects of a Tesla, we’ll continue to improve and enhance Track Mode over time with future over-the-air updates.
 

Gavyne

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That's not all, check this Motor Trends review of release version of Track Mode: https://www.motortrend.com/cars/tes...erformance-track-mode-release-version-review/

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Nearby, the Tesla engineers have more of a look of cool relief. Earlier, a Model 3 Performance—software-flashed with its latest Track mode nervous system and mounted with 10mm-wider Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2s and track-friendly Brembo brake pads—had lapped the course in a 1:21.49. That hammers the 1:23.90 it set six weeks ago on its standard 235/35-20 Michelin Pilot Sport 4S tires under the software supervision of Track mode's earlier, wobblier prototype code.

What no one is quite saying out loud, though, is that a 1:21.49 snips a lifetime-like 1.29 seconds from Randy's recent lap in the Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio. The new time essentially matches a 2016 Porsche Cayman GT4 and even beats a former Best Driver's Car winner, the 2011 Ferrari 458 Italia (1:22.30). Until the new BMW M3 shows up, that perches the Model 3 atop the podium as the world's quickest sport sedan—at least around this track.
 

GDN

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This is some crazy stuff. I'd never drive my car like this in a million years, but if these articles had been released just 3 days earlier, I would have dug a little harder for that extra $10K just knowing what more it could possibly do. They are making a beast out of this car, all by software and all after you've even taken delivery.
 
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OK - they initially said only PUO would get this, then we recently heard that all Performance would - If you have 3P- and get the update, let us know !
 

Domo35

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OK - they initially said only PUO would get this, then we recently heard that all Performance would - If you have 3P- and get the update, let us know !
Got notified of a software update on my Model 3 Performance+. Installed to firmware 2018.42.8. I assume this is for the track mode. Unfortunately I am unable to verify since I’m out of town and updated via Tesla app. Can’t wait to get home and try it out
 

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PandaM3

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#6
Would be great to also get the increased regenerative braking, track focused power train cooling, and the virtual LSD using the ABS system all on the rwd model. A perfect analogy would be the P3D is equivalent to a Carrera GTS awd and the LR Rwd is equivalent to the rwd Carrera T... in other words there is room for improved performance with all the Model3’s. MPP Coilovers on my LR Rwd makes it feel very much like a Cayman/ boxster when it comes to handling and power.
 

Gavyne

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btw Mountain Pass Performance is there at Global Time Attack event in Buttonwillow with Cameron Rogers and his Performance Model 3. They raced with Track Mode on. http://globaltimeattack.com/live/

They posted a time of 1:59.5xx, which is fastest in their class so far. Details here. Competition is today and tomorrow, so they'll have tomorrow to improve on the time.
 
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Got notified of a software update on my Model 3 Performance+. Installed to firmware 2018.42.8. I assume this is for the track mode. Unfortunately I am unable to verify since I’m out of town and updated via Tesla app. Can’t wait to get home and try it out
I just got the same update minutes ago. I’ll report back in the morning when I get to my car.
 

webdriverguy00

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BostonPilot

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#11
So, I updated my M3P+ this morning and sure enough, track mode. I'm working, so all I could do was take it to a nearby cloverleaf I've tested my STi and Focus RS at... I've done the cloverleaf in the Tesla before, the specific section I test on is a decreasing radius turn ending at a stop sign. Usually you have to hit the exit at about 35-40 mph turn in, and hit the accelerator hard. Right about where the radius starts to decrease you have to get on the brakes and slow it enough to make the final part of the turn and stop. The STi (on crappy Dunlops) could peak at 55 mph, the Focus RS on MPSS tires could hit 58, and the M3P+ before track mode could hit 60. The thing is, on the brakes the stability system would be working very hard to keep the car pointed and it felt very unsettled. Just about a week ago I remember thinking how much more I liked the way the STi handled that part because the stability system kept the car settled in a controllable 4 wheel drift rather than jerking the car around on the inside brakes.

Anyway, I ran out this morning and warmed up the tires and did a few times around the cloverleaf and easily hit 65 mph without reaching the limit of adhesion on the tires... Maybe they were *just* starting to slide in the deceleration phase. But without the stability system honking on the inside brakes, the car felt much more controllable. I didn't have time to really reach the limit of what the car could do, but it immediately felt a lot better than it did without track mode. Very controllable and confidence inspiring.

I'm not advocating using it on regular roads (and I certainly won't), but I've used the cloverleaf on 4 previous cars because it's easy to take the car to the limits of the tires and chassis in a very repeatable way (I hope they never repave it!). In any case, I really liked the way it felt and I can't wait to take it to a track... ishot-442.png
 
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So, I updated my M3P+ this morning and sure enough, track mode. I'm working, so all I could do was take it to a nearby cloverleaf I've tested my STi and Focus RS at... I've done the cloverleaf in the Tesla before, the specific section I test on is a decreasing radius turn ending at a stop sign. Usually you have to hit the exit at about 35-40 mph turn in, and hit the accelerator hard. Right about where the radius starts to decrease you have to get on the brakes and slow it enough to make the final part of the turn and stop. The STi (on crappy Dunlops) could peak at 55 mph, the Focus RS on MPSS tires could hit 58, and the M3P+ before track mode could hit 60. The thing is, on the brakes the stability system would be working very hard to keep the car pointed and it felt very unsettled. Just about a week ago I remember thinking how much more I liked the way the STi handled that part because the stability system kept the car settled in a controllable 4 wheel drift rather than jerking the car around on the inside brakes.

Anyway, I ran out this morning and warmed up the tires and did a few times around the cloverleaf and easily hit 65 mph without reaching the limit of adhesion on the tires... Maybe they were *just* starting to slide in the deceleration phase. But without the stability system honking on the inside brakes, the car felt much more controllable. I didn't have time to really reach the limit of what the car could do, but it immediately felt a lot better than it did without track mode. Very controllable and confidence inspiring.

I'm not advocating using it on regular roads (and I certainly won't), but I've used the cloverleaf on 4 previous cars because it's easy to take the car to the limits of the tires and chassis in a very repeatable way (I hope they never repave it!). In any case, I really liked the way it felt and I can't wait to take it to a track... View attachment 17278


I live in Ayer............
 
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#15
Ah, are you going to take your M3 to autocross at Devens?

Probably. I went with "the minus" setup to get through this winter on the 18's and give myself some options for spring. I'm thinking of going with a staggered 19" setup.

Just waiting to officially hear whether or not the minus is getting Track Mode.

Elon said yes, but everyone I've seen who has posted a screenshot has the Plus setup.