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While Tesla advances electric vehicles, legacy automakers and Big Oil team up to save combustion eng

Discussion in 'Tesla News from EVANNEX Blog' started by EVANNEX, Dec 6, 2017.

By EVANNEX on Dec 6, 2017 at 10:05 AM
  1. EVANNEX

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    As Tesla pushes ahead with advances in electric vehicle tech, Wall Street Journal reports, "Big oil and auto makers throw a lifeline to the combustion engine." Sure, the new Tesla Roadster appears to have decimated traditional gas-powered supercars across the spectrum. Nevertheless, "Big oil companies and giant auto makers are teaming up to preserve the internal combustion engine... [just as] as tough regulation and electric vehicles put the car industry’s century-old technology at risk."

    [​IMG]
    Above: A look at the internal combustion engine (Image: Wikipedia Commons)

    Who's involved in this effort? It's reported that, "Exxon Mobil Corp., BP PLC, Royal Dutch Shell PLC and other oil companies are spending millions of dollars a year in concert with auto makers such as Ford Motor Co. and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV to create the next generation of super-slick engine lubricants."

    Why? "They are betting that the new, thinner oils will help them squeeze even more efficiency out of traditional car engines, allowing them to comply with stricter environmental rules and remain relevant as new technologies such as zero-emission electric vehicles gain traction."

    Andrew Hepher, vice president of global commercial technology at Shell explains, “It’s really important that we are able to squeeze the lemon.” Shell has formed partnerships with Fiat Chrysler, among others, on next-gen lubricants. Hepher adds, “The combustion engine has still got a long way to run... Car makers are very, very heavily motivated to improve the economy of their fleet.”

    [​IMG]
    Above: Legacy automakers are hoping that the internal combustion engine can "keep pace" with newer hybrid / electric tech (Image: Wall Street Journal)

    Chris Cowland, director of advanced powertrain engineering at Fiat Chrysler, notes, “We are putting a huge amount of faith in the lubricant oil to keep the engine running smoothly and preventing it from seizing up in seconds.”

    BP has teamed up with, "Ford and Volvo [to] send engine models for rigorous testing by engineers who look at ways to tweak lubricant formulas for more efficiency." Dave Hall, a vice president at Castrol, BP’s lubricants subsidiary explains, "If you can improve a few percent, that is very much worth doing... There’s going to be a lot of internal combustion engines around for a long time.”

    While the oil industry has high hopes, it's reported that, "the combustion engine faces new threats across the world. Countries including the U.K., France, China and India have signaled they plan to ban sales of vehicles with traditional engines... [and] the European Union unveiled an aggressive proposal to cut carbon-dioxide emissions from cars and vans by 30% by 2030. Beijing wants 20% of China’s total vehicle production and sales to be electric and hybrid vehicles by 2025."


    Above: A few of the reasons the internal combustion engine is under siege from electric vehicles (Youtube: EVBox)

    Furthermore, "Critics say there are limits to how much more efficient combustion engines can become... Boston Consulting Group estimates gasoline-only engines won’t meet planned regulations in the U.S. and Europe as soon as 2020, resulting in penalties averaging $500 per vehicle by 2025." And PricewaterhouseCoopers forecasts, "between 2025 and 2030, the cost of battery electric vehicles will fall below the cost of combustion engines,” in a report issued in September — predicting that a shift to electric vehicles is inevitable.

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    Note: Article originally published on evannex.com, by Matt Pressman

    Source: Wall Street Journal
     
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Comments

Discussion in 'Tesla News from EVANNEX Blog' started by EVANNEX, Dec 6, 2017.

    1. MichelT3
      MichelT3
      Doubling and tripling the efficiency of engines????
      While needing to compete with cheaper BEV's and in the face of laws forbidding ICE?
      Either totally ridiculous, or evidence that they purposely have scammed us in buying inefficient engines the past decades, to boost fuel consumption.
    2. arnis
      arnis
      ICE will not hit 50mpg mark easily without hybridization.
      BMW, 1999, 3liter diesel engine, consumes 5l/100km at 80km/h
      BMW, 2009, 3 liter diesel engine, consumes 4,9l/100km at 80km/h
      BMW 2017, 3 liter diesel engine, consumes 4,8l/100km at 80km/h.
      aka 47, 48, 49 mpg. All additional gains come from hybridisation,
      like start-stop, faster warmup, 48V system etc or better aerodynamics,
      rolling resistance etc. Or smaller vehicle.
      Other engines can catch up but there is nowhere to progress.
      18 years of hard work and almost nothing happened, besides less
      noise, less pollution, much more power, faster reaction.
    3. Frank99
      Frank99
    4. arnis
      arnis
      Changing compression ratio is helping gasoline engines catch up with diesel engine efficiency/fuel consumption.
      Though yes, this complexity looks splendid.
    5. Safe Daddy Driver
      Safe Daddy Driver
      Yet another great sign that the oil and traditional auto industries are panicking! The combustion engine will inevitably make its way to the endangered species list in the foreseeable future.
    6. NOGA$4ME
      NOGA$4ME
      Why? (other than the fact that it's an oil company that's saying this)

      There is a perfectly good, superior, and soon to be cheaper solution!

      Well of course an oil company or internal combustion engine maker would feel this way. And I'm fine if they want to feel that way, as long as they don't start spreading anti-EV propaganda. Go ahead and let them come out with fancy new oils and crazy technology for their engines. It's only going to get us to that cost crossover that much sooner.
    7. KarenRei
      KarenRei
      Lol, as if (excepting "classic" cars) people will still be driving ICEs in 2050 ;)

      ---------------------------

      As Ford pushes ahead with advances in automobile vehicle tech, Wall Street Journal reports, "Major breeders and buggy makers throw a lifeline to the horse." Sure, the Model T appears to have decimated horse and buggy travel across the spectrum. Nevertheless, "Major breeders and giant buggy makers are teaming up to preserve the noble steed... [just as] as tough manure regulations and automobiles put the buggy industry’s millenia-old technology at risk."

      Who's involved in this effort? It's reported that, "UVM, Calumet, Claiborne and other big horse breeders are spending millions of dollars a year in concert with buggy makers such as Concorde and Stanhope to create the next generation of super-fast, super-clean horse."

      Why? "They are betting that the new, more refined steeds will help them squeeze even more speed out of traditional horse-drawn buggies, while also allowing them to comply with stricter cleanliness rules and remain relevant as new technologies such as gasoline runabouts gain traction."

      Colonel Joseph Battell, founder of UVM, explains, “It’s really important that we are able to squeeze the lemon - and by lemon, I mean horse, and by squeeze... just forget the analogy.” UVM has formed partnerships with Concorde, among others, on next-gen horse-drawn buggies. Battell adds, “The buggy has still got a long way to run... Horse breeders are very, very heavily motivated to improve the capabilities of their breeding stock.”

      Alfred Pennyworth, director of reins engineering at Concorde, notes, “We are putting a huge amount of faith in the horse to keep the buggy running quickly and preventing it from tiring out before reaching the destination.”

      UVM has teamed up with, "Calumet and Claiborne [to] send breeding stallions for rigorous testing by engineers who look at ways to tweak breeding pairs for more speed." John Battell, a vice president at Morgan, UVM’s stallion-grading subsidiary explains, "If you can improve a few percent, that is very much worth doing... There’s going to be a lot of horses around for a long time.”

      While the horse-breeding industry has high hopes, it's reported that, "the horse faces new threats across the world. Countries including the U.K., France, Germany and Spain have signaled they plan to ban sales of carriages with drawn by horses... [and] the League of Nations unveiled an aggressive proposal to cut diseases spread by manure by 30% by 1930. Berlin wants 20% of Germany's total carriage production and sales to be horseless by 1925."

      Furthermore, "Critics say there are limits to how much more improved horses can become... London Consulting Group estimates horse-drawn buggies won’t meet city-planning guidelines in the U.S. and Europe as soon as 1923, resulting in penalties averaging $50 per vehicle by 1927." And Coopers-By-The-Waterhouse forecasts, "between 1925 and 1930, the cost of horseless carriages will fall below the cost of horse-drawn buggies,” in a report issued in September — predicting that a shift to horseless carriages is inevitable.
      Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
    8. MichelT3
      MichelT3
      Agree. There will be that ‘little’ problem though, where to get gas (and oil), when all gas stations are gone bust... One of the subjects on which forward thinking people in our classic car club are already planning ahead.
    9. KarenRei
      KarenRei
      It'll continue to be available (except in places where it's been totally banned); so long as there's a market, someone will make it. It just won't be available from a widespread network of distributors, or for as cheap as it is today (lower volume = more expensive). The roles will be rather reversed, in that classic car drivers may need to make more use of route planners ;)
    10. @gravityrydr
      @gravityrydr
      The analogy of ICE cars and the horse and buggy is apter than many people realize. There was a real problem with the number of horses in large cities in the 1800's. These cities had a huge health crisis with manure.
      https://99percentinvisible.org/arti...-urban-design-great-horse-manure-crisis-1894/

      The city of New York had a population estimated to be between 100,000 and 170,00 horses. 20+ lbs of manure per horse per day added up fast and was a real health crisis. The car solved that issue by shifting the pollution to a less obvious form.
    11. NRG4All
      NRG4All
      Until tailpipes and radiators run cold the ICE is fighting a losing battle.
    12. Badback
      Badback
      Why can't we just add a "tail pipe" to the horse and discharge the manure directly into the buggy? A'la Ford Escape.
    13. Cjros
      Cjros
      "Squeeze the lemon". That's a pretty good analogy for where ICEs are headed...

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